© Dareen A. Bridge
2005/2007
Collies Through The Ages
Contact the author at ‘Emmsmoor’  •  174  •  HD2  1JS  •  United Kingdom
or e-mail FEEDBACK
Collie Tree.info
wp5533b116.gif
Collie Tree's Home Page About Collie Tree Collies Through the Ages Collie Bibliography
1861-1870
1871-1880
1881-1890
1891-1900
1901-1910
1911-1920
1921-1930
1931-1940
1941-1950
1951-1960
1961-1970
1971-1980
1981-1990
1991-2000
2001-on
By
The Shirley Factor
Mr S. E. Shirley - KC's Founder, 1st Chairman and President
1871-1880
page 1 of 5
Mr S. E. Shirley - A man of his time
1 : 2 : 3 : 4 : 5 : >
Related External Links:
Lough Fea Shirley’s Irish Estate & Trefoil’s Birthplace
Short History of The Kennel Club
wp56a7ff34.png
wp1468948b.png
y the beginning of the 1870s Dog Shows were proliferating throughout the British Isles, but with no controlling body, and rules, such as they
were, set by each show promoting association, the fancy
would have descended into notoriety, had it not been for
the foresight of one man. The Victorian era produced
many visionary men and women who became legendary
leaders within their chosen field,
Mr Sewallis Evelyn
Shirley
MP, of Ettington Park, Warwickshire and Lough
Fea, Ireland, was just such a force in the canine world.
His influence instrumental in the establishment of
‘The Kennel Club’ in 1873 which created a respectability for the fancy far beyond the expectations of its twelve founding members who envisaged nothing more than a show promoting society. Standards were immediately raised by the necessity for all exhibitors to accept a small number of rules, designed to promote sportsmanlike behaviour, at the Kennel Club’s first show held at the Crystal Palace in June the same year. By the end of the decade an increasing number of the newer show promoting societies sought permission to adopt the same set of guidelines, and gradually shows were advertised as
‘Held Under Kennel Club Rules’.
The Kennel Club took a further step on the road to canine government in 1874, with the introduction of ‘The Stud Book’. The first volume, published retrospectively, giving details of all shows held between 1859 and 1873 inclusive, adding descriptions of winning dogs, along with a copy of the, now enlarged, guidelines for Dog Shows and Exhibitors. Three years later, in 1877, the Kennel Club attempted to formulise the title of Champion, which had often been assumed by owners’ after their dogs had achieved a single show place.